Sharing Economy Wins Big In India

Sharing Economy Wins Big In India

The collaborative economy continues its aggressive global push with a plethora of news out of India last week, the latest international market to aggressively pursue sharing focused innovations to solve modern day problems.

Following suit of Ford’s announcement at Mobile Congress, the country seems riveted on leveraging sharing economy disruptions to abate its excessive traffic congestion issues. Last week alone Ola a leading ride share app spent $200 million to acquire competitor TaxiForSure, and Ubermoto a new motorbike sharing service arrived on the scene.

India is looking to abate their traffic issues with motorcycles with Ubermoto which launched in Bangalore last week. Ola, followed suit with a similar service announcement.

In a press release, Uber described uberMOTO as “another step to help cut congestion in Bangalore by getting people out of cars when they don’t need to use them, and by encouraging motorbike drivers to share their ride. … By using today’s transportation infrastructure more efficiently, Uber’s technology can help the government of Karnataka cut traffic and congestion at no extra cost to taxpayers.”

Bengaluru-based PoolCircle launched in April last year with a mission to take a million cars off the roads—“by enabling four people to ride in each car, instead of just one”, says Raghu Ramanujam, founder-CEO of the carpooling/ride-sharing network. “It’s been an exciting journey since then. We have around 4,000 users, largely in Bangalore, with nearly 40% of them being active. We have about 3,000 carpools offered/looking for on our platform on a daily basis,” he adds.

As 2016 continues to unfold, it seems clear that India is poised to be a major sharing economy player. With the government providing better access to credit through financial market reform and market incentives to attract talented staff and flexible contracting laws, key enabling factors stemming from governmental intervention and relaxed regulation will play a key role in the future success of the sharing economy in the region.

“As long as we deliver value to end users and are able to win customer affection, regulations are never going to be a challenge. Regulations will evolve. At the end of the day, sharing economy drives huge benefits not only from the economic point of view, but also from environmental and social points of view,” Ramanujam, said.

With sharing central to India’s culture as a whole, the country seems poised to be among the world’s leaders in collaborative consumption. Perhaps the country can set a model on the need to have regulation keep pace with innovation as our new and exciting world of we takes flight.

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce released in December 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

Wecommerce book Sharing Economy

innovation sharing economy

WE-Conomy: Regulation Aims To Keep Pace With Innovation in 2016

 

The NSW government followed suit of the state of Arizona today with the release of a wide sweeping plan designed to continue the advancement of the collaborative economy.

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-19/uber-airbnb-kickstarter-the-subject-of-nsw-government-paper/7097690

As detractors continue to harp on regulatory hurdles created by the new economic engine, the NSW government becomes the latest to push back on obstacles created by our new environment with a plan designed to harness its many opportunities.

The new document out of Australia flags a new regulatory framework for services like Airbnb and Uber. It also pinpoints the sharing economy’s value currently at $504 million and is welcomed by parties on both sides of the debate including Airbnb and the Tourism Accommodation of Australia.

Airbnb Australia’s manager Sam McDonagh said the position paper recognized the contribution the share economy made to the state’s economy, including to help grow and diversify tourism. “We think the announcement by the Government today is really great for everyone in NSW and particularly Airbnb hosts, the everyday Australians, the mums and dads who make a small modest income sharing their homes on Airbnb,” he said. He said one of the things Airbnb hears from its hosts is that regulation varies widely around the nation from state to state, to council to council and now there will be a base for a clear national framework.

This uniform approach to regulation could serve as an excellent model to duplicate as regions around the world struggle to close the gap between regulation and innovation as the economy continues to grow at a blistering pace.

Interestingly, the NSW plan aims to highlight the major advantages created by our new economy, things often overlooked by the opposition:

  1. The collaborative economy is creating opportunities for microenterprise and self-employment.
  2. It is providing opportunities for people to earn additional or supplementary income.
  3. An estimated 45,000 people earned income through the collaborative economy in the last 12-month

As 2016 continues to unfold, we can only hope that this type of smart collaboration between the public and private sector continues with an eye on creating a new narrative around the historical struggle between innovation and regulation. To do so, a focus on the collective WE over the singular ME will me most imperative.

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce released in December 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

Wecommerce book Sharing Economy

 

 

Sharing Economy

Part 3: Collaborative Consumption Not Just for StartUps Any Longer

On the heels of major announcements by auto sector giants GM and Ford getting into the sharing economy game with GM investing $500 million in Lyft and Ford announcing a shared leasing model, the aerospace sector followed suit today with Airbus announcing a new partnership with Uber.

The new Airbus partnership with sharing economy unicorn Uber is part of an experiment that would allow Uber users to hail copters, as well as other forms of transportation.

The recently-formed Airbus Ventures will operate with $150 million commitment to “identify and invest in the most visionary entrepreneurs in the global aerospace ecosystem,” Airbus said in a release.

This new tie up will allow Airbus to provide on-demand transportation service using its H125 and H130 helicopters. According to Airbus, the partnership will help carve out “a new business model for helicopter operators to access a broader customer base.”

With this news, it is clear that the sharing economy is no longer a blip or fad, but rather a pervasive economic engine that is here to stay. And one that is at the front lines of business innovation and disruption.

As the line between sharing economy companies and traditional businesses continues to blur, it is likely that collaborative consumption will continue to move away from being compartmentalized and toward a center of business strategy and innovation. This will be similar to the evolution we saw with technology and digital strategies over the last decade, and what we are also currently seeing with the new purposeful business movement.

With a clear footprint into traditional industries ranging from transportation to lodging to aerospace, retail and auto, 2016 seems poised to be the year WE-Commerce explodes as the visceral shift from the singular me to the collective we evolves into a powerful new economic paradigm.

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce due out in Fall 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

Wecommerce book Sharing Economy

 

Collaborative Consumption Not Just for StartUps Any Longer

Part 1: Collaborative Consumption Not Just for StartUps Any Longer

As we enter 2016, it seems clear that the much talked about age of collaborative consumption is most definitely not a blip or fad, but rather a new economic paradigm with far reaching tentacles.

We see the economy’s power and imprint everywhere from the stages of CES this week at a global conference once focused solely on electronic gadgetry, to the campaign trail where candidates are tripping over themselves to develop platforms around the topic that will increase their poll numbers.

What’s most interesting to me however is the impact the sharing economy is having on traditional businesses. The latest shift we are seeing is with large market leading giants becoming smart enough to recognize that the new economy is a perfect testament to the old adage “if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em.”

A great example is this week’s GM announcement of a $500 million dollar investment into Lyft. The partnership will help the start up to develop autonomous vehicles which will definitely be a boon to the future of ride sharing models, as will the spate of short-term rental hubs the new alliance will aim to create. http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/01/05/technology/gm-invests-in-lyft.html?referer=

The GM news follows a flurry of other announcements highlighting how big business is getting into the sharing economy game. Other notable deals include the massive investment by Hyatt into Airbnb competitor onefinestay and Absolut’s new local distillery program.

While it’s clear that the line between traditional and sharing economy companies is blurring, what seems to be in question is whether keeping an uber niche focus or pushing into larger conglomerate service type structures is preferred.

With companies like Uber branching off from just transportation to everything from food delivery to courier services, the question that lies ahead is how to create scale, while still remaining small enough in focus to achieve the levels of agility and innovation required to compete in today’s ultra competitive marketplace.

I for one believe that the too big to fail mentality most definitely applies here. As we move further and further from the hubris that drove the 2008 meltdown, we must not forget the Jobsian wisdom that pioneered our new world order. Be good at one thing and do that one thing better than anyone else.

Collaborative Consumption Not Just for StartUps Any Longer

With sharing economy “purists” popping up in places like Berlin with initiatives like borrowing shops, shared refrigerators, and community gardens on the rise, it seems clear that maintaining a crystallized definition of what collaborative consumption is and is not, and what the critical factors are for success vs. failure, will be essential to ascertaining the potential and longevity of our We-Commerce world. http://www.irishtimes.com/news/consumer/berlin-s-sharing-economy-a-glimpse-of-the-future-1.2475033

The Lyft GM news seems like a step in the right direction. Two transportation innovators coming together with a rifle shot vision to imagine the future transformation of the sector. Let’s hope that other leading sharing economy companies retain their humility and keep their focus so we don’t harken back to the days of the late 1990s tech boom and find ourselves in another pets.com type of bubble.

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce due out in Fall 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

Wecommerce book Sharing Economy

Sharing Economy Wecommerce

3 People who Inspired me to Write We-Commerce Book

It’s our choice. It’s up to each and every one of us together to live and change for the House of WE. WE can build a better world out of the ashes of creative destruction. We can choose purpose over profit, passion and artistry over productivity, elegance over efficiency, slow food over fast food. Bigger is better is dead. White is the new green. Quality of life is the new American Dream. The economy of engagement is the new Made in the USA. Hanging on to a crumbling status quo will not make you safe. It’s already too late. You can’t stop the forces of change once they are in motion. Watch for the signs of the new world order unfolding, and adjust accordingly. Become a connoisseur of CULToure. Read the handwriting on the wall. Be the handwriting on the wall. Adapt to the demands of Creative Darwinism. Become an artist of life. Grow your own. Be a true original. Unite, destroy, create, sustain, imagine a better world and do one thing every day to make your House of WE a reality. Do it for the many, not the few, and in collective cooperation. Make friends with the unknown. Stand up. Stand out. Let go of the drama. Enter the 5th Dimension and then invite your friends over for a home cooked meal. Be open. Be flexible. Be agile. Dance. WE are all starting from scratch, starting today. This chance may not come again in our lifetime. Here are 3 people who inspired me to write this book.

  1. Andy Warhol as he invented the sharing economy driving notion of everybody having the chance to become famous for 15 minutes. (Also because he said he wanted to die with his blue jeans on #whatawaytogo)

sharing economy andy warhol

  1. Steve Jobs because he invented the age of experience we are living in today that the new #weconomy is built upon. Apple creating not just stellar products but the brand experiences that create new passion, was the gateway to the bespoke detail today’s sharing economy thrives upon.

sharing economy steve jobs

  1. Jim Morrison as he was among the world’s greatest storytellers ever and showed how a song could be an immersive experience through the collision of incomparable lyrics, performance and sound. Jim was an early pioneer of using omni channeled creative approaches to drive the level of brand immersion today’s sharing economy consumers demand.

Jim-Morrison sharing economy

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce due out in Fall 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

PS – You can download a FREE chapter of  We-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy here! 

Free Chapter Sharing Economy