Sharing Economy Wins Big In India

Sharing Economy Wins Big In India

The collaborative economy continues its aggressive global push with a plethora of news out of India last week, the latest international market to aggressively pursue sharing focused innovations to solve modern day problems.

Following suit of Ford’s announcement at Mobile Congress, the country seems riveted on leveraging sharing economy disruptions to abate its excessive traffic congestion issues. Last week alone Ola a leading ride share app spent $200 million to acquire competitor TaxiForSure, and Ubermoto a new motorbike sharing service arrived on the scene.

India is looking to abate their traffic issues with motorcycles with Ubermoto which launched in Bangalore last week. Ola, followed suit with a similar service announcement.

In a press release, Uber described uberMOTO as “another step to help cut congestion in Bangalore by getting people out of cars when they don’t need to use them, and by encouraging motorbike drivers to share their ride. … By using today’s transportation infrastructure more efficiently, Uber’s technology can help the government of Karnataka cut traffic and congestion at no extra cost to taxpayers.”

Bengaluru-based PoolCircle launched in April last year with a mission to take a million cars off the roads—“by enabling four people to ride in each car, instead of just one”, says Raghu Ramanujam, founder-CEO of the carpooling/ride-sharing network. “It’s been an exciting journey since then. We have around 4,000 users, largely in Bangalore, with nearly 40% of them being active. We have about 3,000 carpools offered/looking for on our platform on a daily basis,” he adds.

As 2016 continues to unfold, it seems clear that India is poised to be a major sharing economy player. With the government providing better access to credit through financial market reform and market incentives to attract talented staff and flexible contracting laws, key enabling factors stemming from governmental intervention and relaxed regulation will play a key role in the future success of the sharing economy in the region.

“As long as we deliver value to end users and are able to win customer affection, regulations are never going to be a challenge. Regulations will evolve. At the end of the day, sharing economy drives huge benefits not only from the economic point of view, but also from environmental and social points of view,” Ramanujam, said.

With sharing central to India’s culture as a whole, the country seems poised to be among the world’s leaders in collaborative consumption. Perhaps the country can set a model on the need to have regulation keep pace with innovation as our new and exciting world of we takes flight.

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce released in December 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

Wecommerce book Sharing Economy

Collaborative Economy

Collaborative Economy As A Critical Component Of Business Strategy

As hype continues over the dangers and impermanence of the collaborative economy, it has been interesting to see major corporate behemoths get in the ring.

As 2016 unfolds, news about companies ranging from Ford to Boeing placing sharing as a critical component of business strategy as opposed to passing gimmick or fad, has been rampant.

What’s even more interesting however is noting how the very principles of sharing propelling our economy today have been used throughout history by business visionaries. Used by true innovators who understood that coming together for the greater good was always an effective way to disrupt the status quo with an eye toward creating a better tomorrow.

As Tech Crunch recently reported, DHL, a bastion of global shipping, started when they offered people free airline tickets in return for courier services. This model was based on innovation centered around collaboration, and is a testament to the endurance of business strategies centered upon the collective we over the singular me.

This sharing idea launched a global shipping giant and introduced the idea of containerization to the world. Not so different than what sharing economy leader Nimber is doing today, four decades later, with further reimagined courier modeling.

The history of DHL is also a testament to the power of how disruptive collaborative centered models have the power to actually skirt the inherent power of monopolies. In the case with DHL, the postal system.

Isn’t it therefore ironic that sharing economy opposers continue to cite insurmountable regulation hurdles as reasons to why the new economy must be stopped, when in essence the core of collaborative consumption is at it’s heart a mechanism for taking the power out of the hands of the few and placing it in the hands of the many? DHL was born from a disruption designed to circumvent failed regulation: postal monopoly anyone?

Clearly the world is taking note of this irony with not just big business but everyone from students at the University of Virginia, (http://www.cavalierdaily.com/article/2016/02/doyle-dont-overregulate-sharing-economy) to governments as far flung as Australia and Japan (http://www.wsj.com/articles/japan-slowly-opens-the-door-to-the-sharing-economy-1455008405) pushing for relaxed regulatory mandates that work to put in place necessary guardrails, while not diminishing the awesome potential good our new collaborative economy can proffer.

Innovation vs. regulation is a titanic struggle as old as David vs. Goliath. Hopefully this round will go to the collective WE with a world where unfettered innovation centered around sharing is the right of anyone willing to be a contender.

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce released in December 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

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WE-Conomy: Regulation Aims To Keep Pace With Innovation in 2016

 

The NSW government followed suit of the state of Arizona today with the release of a wide sweeping plan designed to continue the advancement of the collaborative economy.

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-19/uber-airbnb-kickstarter-the-subject-of-nsw-government-paper/7097690

As detractors continue to harp on regulatory hurdles created by the new economic engine, the NSW government becomes the latest to push back on obstacles created by our new environment with a plan designed to harness its many opportunities.

The new document out of Australia flags a new regulatory framework for services like Airbnb and Uber. It also pinpoints the sharing economy’s value currently at $504 million and is welcomed by parties on both sides of the debate including Airbnb and the Tourism Accommodation of Australia.

Airbnb Australia’s manager Sam McDonagh said the position paper recognized the contribution the share economy made to the state’s economy, including to help grow and diversify tourism. “We think the announcement by the Government today is really great for everyone in NSW and particularly Airbnb hosts, the everyday Australians, the mums and dads who make a small modest income sharing their homes on Airbnb,” he said. He said one of the things Airbnb hears from its hosts is that regulation varies widely around the nation from state to state, to council to council and now there will be a base for a clear national framework.

This uniform approach to regulation could serve as an excellent model to duplicate as regions around the world struggle to close the gap between regulation and innovation as the economy continues to grow at a blistering pace.

Interestingly, the NSW plan aims to highlight the major advantages created by our new economy, things often overlooked by the opposition:

  1. The collaborative economy is creating opportunities for microenterprise and self-employment.
  2. It is providing opportunities for people to earn additional or supplementary income.
  3. An estimated 45,000 people earned income through the collaborative economy in the last 12-month

As 2016 continues to unfold, we can only hope that this type of smart collaboration between the public and private sector continues with an eye on creating a new narrative around the historical struggle between innovation and regulation. To do so, a focus on the collective WE over the singular ME will me most imperative.

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce released in December 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

Wecommerce book Sharing Economy

 

 

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Touchdown: WEconomy In the Game at Super Bowl 50 With Emotionally Charged Offense 

As the Super Bowl prepares to celebrate its half century mark, sharing economy brands and the emotional benefits they provide, are as front and center as the Broncos and the Panthers.

Demonstrating the pervasiveness of the age of collaborative consumption on all walks of life, major sharing economy brands have been making noise as we lead up to Sunday’s big event in the way of live experiences that offer emotional reward, a signature of our new WE-Conomy world.

While traditionalists may be anxiously awaiting the annual ad creations of Budweiser and Hyundai on the big screen, WeConomy addicts are anticipating the benefits of collaborative consumption that can serve to enhance their Super Bowl experience. As Bowl festivities kick off in San Francisco, home to many of today’s greatest sharing economy disruptors, news has started to percolate on impending game time offerings.

Airbnb sees the weekend as a major opportunity to highlight the benefits of home rental, particularly as their company started when the founders rented out their home around a local conference when hotel rooms were at a premium. Highlighting everything from their many rooms in the area, to the special experiences their unique properties like a treetop bungalow can offer, the acclaimed brand has been making a lot of noise this week stating that 11,000 guests are already booked into 4,000 of their local properties. The estimated boon to the local economy for the weekend is $21 million.

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Not to be left on the sidelines, Uber has announced a slew of new offerings around the big game, in line with their recent push to be all things to all people in our sharing world. Offering everything from shared puppies, a flag football game with Joe Montana, to an Uber POOLtrain designed to take groups of people back and forth from key areas, the ride share giant is using this weekend as a testing ground for future disruptive sharing models predicated on emotional reward.

Postmates has also thrown its hat into the ring with a Super Bowl Squares community football pool which promises collaborative fun and food delivery discounts for the winners.

While many of the benefits of the sharing economy will be felt off the big screen, the impact our new environment has had on increasingly emotional experiences will be felt in some of the top ads anticipated this year. With a push on emotional levers from tugging heartstrings (Pokemon “I can do that” ad) to empathy (Colgate’s “Every drop counts spot) to the much buzzed about humorous show stealer (Steve Harvey’s Miss Universe flub in a possible Snickers bit), it is clear that both traditional companies and sharing economy players are aiming to create deeply emotional experiences that transcend product and service to win with consumers.

While the winner of the big game is still in question, what is most clear is that empathy and emotion hold the key to victory for brands in our new passion charged WE-Conomy.

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce released in December 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

Wecommerce book Sharing Economy

Sharing Economy

Part 3: Collaborative Consumption Not Just for StartUps Any Longer

On the heels of major announcements by auto sector giants GM and Ford getting into the sharing economy game with GM investing $500 million in Lyft and Ford announcing a shared leasing model, the aerospace sector followed suit today with Airbus announcing a new partnership with Uber.

The new Airbus partnership with sharing economy unicorn Uber is part of an experiment that would allow Uber users to hail copters, as well as other forms of transportation.

The recently-formed Airbus Ventures will operate with $150 million commitment to “identify and invest in the most visionary entrepreneurs in the global aerospace ecosystem,” Airbus said in a release.

This new tie up will allow Airbus to provide on-demand transportation service using its H125 and H130 helicopters. According to Airbus, the partnership will help carve out “a new business model for helicopter operators to access a broader customer base.”

With this news, it is clear that the sharing economy is no longer a blip or fad, but rather a pervasive economic engine that is here to stay. And one that is at the front lines of business innovation and disruption.

As the line between sharing economy companies and traditional businesses continues to blur, it is likely that collaborative consumption will continue to move away from being compartmentalized and toward a center of business strategy and innovation. This will be similar to the evolution we saw with technology and digital strategies over the last decade, and what we are also currently seeing with the new purposeful business movement.

With a clear footprint into traditional industries ranging from transportation to lodging to aerospace, retail and auto, 2016 seems poised to be the year WE-Commerce explodes as the visceral shift from the singular me to the collective we evolves into a powerful new economic paradigm.

Billee Howard is Founder + Chief Engagement Officer of Brandthropologie, a cutting edge communications consulting firm specializing in helping organizations and individuals to produce innovative, creative and passionate dialogues with target communities, consumers and employees, while blazing a trail toward new models of artful, responsible, and sustainable business success. Billee is a veteran communications executive in brand development, trend forecasting, strategic media relations, and C-suite executive positioning. She has a book dedicated to the study of the sharing economy called WeCommerce due out in Fall 2015 as well as a blog entitled the #HouseofWe dedicated to curating the trends driving our economy forward. You can read more about “WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy” right here!

Wecommerce book Sharing Economy